Thing 10: Search Strategies

#1:
I researched Computer Games Appropriate and Computer Games Inappropriate first, and really didn’t find much, so I switched to:
Children and Computer Games

SIRS Discoverer Deluxe
Appropriateness:  It is stated in 21 Things 4 Teachers that this is Middle/High School Level, but on MEL it is stated that this is K-9.  I found it harder to negotiate.
Usability:  This Database was more difficult to find appropriate information.  It would have take a lot of patience to find what was needed.  I really like that the articles showed the Lexile score and the size.
C.  Context:  See B.  There were many articles that were not actually related to the topic, but once the related ones were found, they had good information.
D.  Credibility of the pair of databases for use within the classroom:  I think that I would use the Renaissance.

SIRS Renaissance
A.  Appropriateness:  It is stated in 21 Things 4 Teachers that this is Middle/High School Level, but on MEL it is stated that this is High School, College, University.  I found it easier to negotiate.
B.  Usability:  The sites popped up and were appropriate to the topic. I really like that the articles showed the Lexile score and the size.
C.  Context:  The articles were generally on topic.
D.  Credibility of the pair of databases for use within the classroom: Since BOTH sites had basically the same Lexile scores AND size of articles, I would choose to use this one in the classroom.

How do these resources support the bet practice of ”generating and testing hypotheses?

I like both of these sources as the student can create their own question and find answers to the question.  Either of these would work in researching a debate topic, Pro and Con. for instance.  I can imagine using this strategy in most of the subjects being taught:  Why did Columbus try to find India by going west? for history, or any science project, or drawing conclusions and making inferences….  I think these databases would work well in a classroom, especially for generating and testing hypotheses.

#2
For adult GED students, the first database is the collection.  There are 2428 resources directly related to the GED.  http://mel.org/

I would also use Learning Express Library.  It includes a Computer Center, a Job and Career Accelerator, an Adult Education Center, and several others.  There is a wealth of information there.  The Web Site is: http://www.learningexpresshub.com/learningexpresslibrary/home

There are others I would use for individuals.  For instance, I have a student from Jamaica and he has little prior knowledge of US history and Civics.  I would use Michigana:  Sources of US History:  http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/Michigana;jsessionid=E5D692964CBB6F72B6238990A15F36D3?locID=lom_accessmich

#3
http://www.ovaprima.org/
This is the Ova Prima Foundation

This web site actually meets much of the criteria for a good web site.
1.  The content is comprehensive and understandable. If a student doesn’t have a lot of prior knowledge, this site could easily be taken seriously.
2.  The authority/ credibility seemed to be good.  I checked with Snopes and it didn’t pop up.  Yahoo just came up with the sites already listed on the site itself.
3.  The bias is obvious:  The mission of the Ova Prima Foundation is to:

to shed light upon the primacy and importance of the egg, in a peaceful, non-violent, multi-disciplinary exchange of information and ideas between scientists and scholars worldwide.

Really?  This is pretty silly, but it takes maturity and knowledge to recognize it.
4.  Usability and design was really good.

This site is hard to prove it is a spoof, except for common sense!

The second site is Save the Rennets:   http://savetherennets.com

This, too, is a silly spoof:  Rennets are added to milk when making cheese as this aids the coagulation process necessary for the production of cheese.  It actually made me laugh out loud.

Everything in the first evaluation is true about this one.  Funny, though!

#4
Shaffer, David Williamson. <i>How Computer Games Help Children Learn</i>. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006. Print.

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